It's been said that attention, focus, contemplation, and reflection are distinctly human qualities.  Yet these qualities are increasing becoming endangered abilities.  A survey of one SU class, based on a 7 day log-in assignment, found  that the average number of hours in techno-usage (internet, email, texting, cell phone, phone, TV, etc.) was 26.5 hours; over one day a week, and the students confessed this was an underestimation of usage.
This workshop will be based on an incredible new book, Distracted: The erosion of attention and the coming dark age.  (2008) Maggie Jackson.  This book is  widely researched, fully annotated, and written in an engaging literary style.  "Maggie Jackson's fascinating book on America's collective attention deficit disorder is a wake-up call to all of us to take back our lives, turn off the technology, and focus on paying attention to what makes us human and fulfilled." -- Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Harvard Business School Professor and author of “America the Principled and Confidence."
This workshop will include brief overview of recent findings regarding technology usage (in regards to attention, focus, quality of life), future projected scenarios, and reactions to Distracted.  Special attention will be given to actual curricular and classroom practices that might help students focus and reflect on technology in their lives.
           Workshop will provide participants with the book Distracted and fabulous collegiality.
 
Thanks to Seattle U OIT and Angelo Carosio (Webmaster)
 
 
 
 
The Elephant in the Living Room:
Distraction and its impact on 
students' intellectual and personal life.



Prof. Mara Adelman
Associate Professor
Seattle University 
Dept. of Communication
206)398-4316
mara@seattleu.edumailto:mara@seattleu.edushapeimage_3_link_0
 
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