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Jennifer Loertscher

Jennifer Loertscher, Ph.D.
Asst. Professor of Chemistry
Telephone: (206) 296-5945
e-mail:
loertscher@seattleu.edu


Education
Professional Experience
Publications
Presentations
View C.V.

 

Education

PhD in Environmental Toxicology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2001.
        Additional specialization in Biochemistry.

BA in Chemistry, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA, 1996.

BA in German, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 1996

Professional Experience

Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, Seattle University, Seattle, WA, 2003-present.

Postdoctoral Research Fellow. Laboratory of Dr. Robin Wright. Department of Zoology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, October 2001 to August 2003.

Trainee. National Research Service Award Predoctoral Traineeship in Environmental Toxicology. Environmental Toxicology Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, June 1997 to May 1999 and September 2000 to August 2001.

Research Assistant. Department of Pathology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, June 1999 to August 2000.

Publications

The ERAD components Ubc7p, Cue1p, and Doa10p are essential for viability in cells with increased sterol biosynthetic capacity . Jennifer Loertscher, Lynelle Larson, Mark Parrish, Aaron Sturm, Christine Tachibana, Martin Bard, Robin Wright (manuscript submitted).

A Low-Tech, High-Throughput Screen of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Deletion Mutant Collection Efficiently Identifies Genes Involved in Karmellae Biogenesis. Jennifer Loertscher, Emily Cadera, Dangelei Fox, Clint Matson, Jeffrey Shaver, Christine Tachibana, Robin Wright (manuscript in preparation).

In Utero Exposure to 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) Causes Accelerated Terminal Differentiation in Fetal Mouse Skin. Loertscher, J. A., T. M. Lin., R. E. Peterson, B. L. Allen-Hoffmann. (2002) Toxicological Science 68, 465-472.

Treatment of Normal Human Keratinocytes With 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) Causes a Reduction in Cell Number, But No Increase in Apoptosis. Loertscher J. A., C. M. Sadek, B. L. Allen-Hoffmann. (2001) Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 175, 114-120.

2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) Alters the Differentiation Pattern of Human Keratinocytes in Organotypic Culture. Loertscher J. A., C. A. Sattler, B. L. Allen-Hoffmann. (2001) Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 175, 121-129.

 

Presentations

Invited Lectures

University of Washington, Biology 401, Seattle, WA, October 2002, “Ubiquitin is involved in HMG-CoA Reductase-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Biogenesis.”

Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology Meeting, Madison, WI, July-August 2002, “A low-tech, high-throughput screen of the deletion mutant collection efficiently identifies karmellae biogenesis genes.”

Carroll College, Waukesha, WI, May 2000, “The Effects of Dioxin on Human and Mouse Skin.”

Poster Presentations at National Scientific Meetings

ASCB Non-traditional Functions of Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-like Proteins, poster presentation, August 2002, Colorado Springs, CO. Ubiquitin is involved in endoplasmic reticulum biogenesis in a proteasome-independent manner. Jennifer Loertscher, Christine Tachibana, Emily Cadera, Mark Parrish, Lynelle Larson, Dangelei Fox, Robin Wright.

Society of Toxicology national meeting, poster presentation, March 2001, San Francisco, CA. The effects of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on keratinocytes in organotypic cultures follows a structure-activity relationaship. J. A. Loertscher, C. A. Sattler, B. L. Allen-Hoffmann.

Society of Toxicology national meeting, poster presentation, March 2000, Philadelphia, PA. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) causes accelerated differentiation, but not apoptosis, in keratinocytes in organotypic culture. J. A. Loerstcher, C. A. Sattler, and B. L. Allen-Hoffmann.

Society of Toxicology national meeting, poster presentation, March 1999, New Orleans, LA. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) causes alterations in differentiation in keratinocytes in organotypic culture. J. A. Loertscher, C. A. R. Ivarie, M. A. Weitzel, and B. L. Allen-Hoffmann.

Society of Toxicology national meeting, poster presentation, March 1998, Seattle, WA. The Ah Receptor is not required for suspension-induced apoptosis in keratinocytes. J. A. Loertscher, M. A. Weitzel, C. M. Sadek, and B. L. Allen-Hoffmann.

 

 

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